Masala Digital

Marketing Masala in the Digital Age

Shake off that click, willya?

Its painful to see just how some myopic online marketers in India have shortchanged the medium.

In India, its been an uphill, albeit fun journey to convince traditional marketers to realize the online potential. Why even debate the fact that its simpler for most marketing managers to go along with traditional – considering they grew up with it and hey, they are assessed internally for stuff they do for a billion Indians…not the extra 0.3 above that eh? Hmm. Sobering thought.

Now instead of building the online story, the charisma, the wow and really, capitalizing on its niche value as the preferred medium of the “classes” – the early onliners tried making a quick buck and rep by exploiting the ultimate clincher – performance – a bit early in the game. All because, no marketer was paying attention to their incessant whine otherwise, and maybe they weren’t too good any other which way.

So, the whole “only a person clicks” was misconstrued into this magical sounding “direct” and “personal” story and sold in the name of “CPL” – effectively screwing up not just the user experience that was now inundated with ads, but also leading to malpractices like click frauds that cheated the brands.

All this done to a medium that is truly personal, and in a space where humans actually spend time with themselves.

Why advertise when you can talk here? Why hurry when we can build relationships? For once we have the opportunity to truly realize terms like CRM, Loyalty, Preference and desires like love. Let’s not screw it up any further, shall we?

And to the CPL media planners – hell, they are shaking the Wii now..go measure that! 😀

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  • Digital or Die!

    Original article here: http://www.clickz.com/showPage.html?page=3630966

    Digital or Die

    By Rebecca Lieb, The ClickZ Network, Sep 26, 2008

    One of the most crammed, standing-room-only sessions at MIXX this week featured the media directors of top agencies, including Digitas, Mediaedge:cia, Neo@Ogilvy, and MindShare. As they talked targeting and how they were spending millions of media dollars for their respective rosters of blue-chip clients, online media trainer extraordinaire Leslie Laredo leaned over to whisper in my ear, “Not a single person on this panel is over 30.”

    Whether her observation is literally true is moot. The point is these senior agency executives are young, much younger than their typical counterparts on the traditional media side of the table.

    Why? Are old dogs so adverse to learning new tricks? Because certainly at MIXX, as well as at OMMA last week, bemoaning the digital talent gap was a cry that emerged early and often.

    It’s not just old-timers on the traditional agency side of the equation who are stubbornly resisting the shift to digital. It’s an issue across the media landscape. Their reluctance was perhaps somewhat understandable in the go-go ’90s and in the sober, austere, bleak era around 2002.

    But now?

    Still, I’m seeing traditional publishers cut back on digital endeavors (and digital staff) in a desperate and futile effort to sustain their flagging, dead-tree legacy brands. I’m seeing digital executives going to senior management with requests for back-end tools, such as content management systems and social media software, only to learn their corporate overlords have no idea what all that stuff is, much less what it’s actually used for or how it can benefit the business.

    And I’m seeing some of those print publications flatline. Friends who have been print journalists for decades are panicking in the face of cutbacks, early retirement, consolidation, and plain old extinction.

    But they’re not learning digital skills. A critic friend stays up nights over the fact his paper is due to shutter at month’s end. When I inquired about his online skills, he replied that even the most fundamental elements of a story, such as hyperlinks, were determined and executed by the online editor. He doesn’t know how to do any of that stuff.

    An entrepreneur behind an online publishing startup, meanwhile, recently posed a hypothetical question: “If you could hire a top journalist with 20 years’ traditional experience or someone fresh out of J-school who knew the Web cold, which person would you hire?”

    No contest. Hands down, I’d make the kid an offer.

    New media is becoming old hat. It’s a fact of life. OMMA and MIXX were packed, refreshingly, with new faces. I’m speaking next week at MIMA in Minneapolis, another sold-out interactive marketing event. Newfound interest in and support for digital advertising is heartening, yet there’s still an astonishing degree of pushback across the media industries.

    Across all industries and sectors, in fact. Veteran Web consultant and publisher Larry Chase related a story this week about rescuing a neighbor’s virus-infected hard drive (they’d let their virus protection software subscription expire). The relieved and chastised owner piped up that while they didn’t know much about virus protection, they had just learned how to create an e-mail attachment.

    Clinging to Luddism and deliberate blindness in the face of the digital revolution (no understatement there!) may have been cute 10 years ago. Today, it’s inexcusable.

    Those glib and somewhat arrogant aphorisms, such as “everything that can be digital will be,” have come to pass. In a climate buffeted by a tumultuous economy and tenuous job security, the advertising and media industries really have reached the point of go-digital-or-die.

    The question, of course, is how do you change attitudes? How can media professionals be made to understand and convinced to embrace digital media and Web literacy, e-mail accounts, and the occasional Amazon order? It’s disheartening to watch friends and colleagues lose jobs — as well as their future prospects — before they wake up to this no-longer-new reality.

    So what’s the answer? Some sort of digital Peace Corps? Community college courses? Should companies undertake in-house training initiatives?

    What are you doing? Because friends can no longer allow friends to remain digitally illiterate. Or is the media and advertising landscape going to have to undergo a Wall Street meltdown before people start to change?

    Ad dictionary..an adrant by Adland!

     

    Originally submitted by Dabitch. Some mods added!

    The advertising dictionary is useful for both adn00bs and adknowing and everyone in between.
    Note: this ad dictionary was hosted in another place where you could add words before our redesign, created in 2001. I figure I’d simply repost it as a regular blog post now since submissions declined.
    AstroTurf Marketing: Astroturf marketing is what you do when you post anything in a very (very!) popular blog and/or community blog simply to spread the word, like how great Pepsi Blue is, or how you like Terry Tate the office linebacker (with links) or whatever else you want to go ‘viral’.
    See also Astroturf – From Disinfopedia, the encyclopedia of propaganda. :”Senator Lloyd Bentsen, himself a long-time Washington and Wall Street insider, is credited with coining the term “astroturf lobbying”.” In other words, astroturf began in the political arena and seeped out to the consumer arena…

    Account Consecutive: These AE’s use the same dang plan and media mix for each and every one of their clients, no matter if they’re a small skateboard manufacturer or a national supplemental health insurance group for senior citizens. Also known as Coasters.

    (an) Add: To add is what you learned in early math class, as in 2+2=5. It’s also how dyslexic copywriters and people who do not work in advertising thinks one spells “ad” as in “advert”. Well, it’s wrong, just to clear that up. Besides, in advertising we think 1+1=3, so you really shouldn’t be talking math with us. 😉

    Adland: this is common term for this website, including the subsites/subsections such as Badland, the Commercial Archive, the adforums and so on. We’ve called it that since 1996 and old habits die hard. I should know, I still smoke.

    Adgrunt: I coined the expression here as a way to describe the audience that arrives, we are the sick twisted souls that use the remote control in order to find the commercials, rather than avoid them.

    Borelancer: A freelance creative who spends his or her entire time talking about who they’ve worked with, what they’ve learned and how you could use it to become better at your job.

    Blogaganda: Exactly what you think it is, propaganda in blogs or blogs created specifically in order to spew propaganda. Term coined here 2004

    Buzzard: You know this type – uses “utilize” instead of “use,” “proactive” in every other sentence, etc. Matter of fact, this type of person is so into it that they can use “paradigm” as a noun, verb and/or adjective.

    Choppywriter: A jerkwad (usually a part-owner of the agency) who spends mebbe half a minute pretending to think deeply about a client, writes down three or four random words* on a piece of paper, and hands it down for somebody else to try and flesh it out into an actual concept – and of course takes full credit for the concept if the underlings actually develop anything from it.
    *examples of word chop clusters…. “peanut, breasts, green, hair,” “boxers, hat, bananas, awning,” or “mutton, gremlin, ointment, eraser.”

    Copy Wanker (Courtesy I am kidding.Really.) – the writer who sneaks sexual innuendo into anything including ads for laundry detergents, prescription drugs and disposable nappies with the motto “sex sells”.

    Copywronger: An account manager who insists on telling people his or her embarrassingly bad copy ideas. See also Management Copywriter.

    Clue by Four: unknown origin : something you’d like to smack a certain mediabuyer – who bought Mercedes newspaper ad space in conjunction with Princess Di’s death being reported – over the head with.

    Creative Departed (Courtesy mochazina): a CD who is rumored to once have been creative but these days rides firmly on the shoulders of the creative department.

    Demi-production head: A senior producer who refuses to be on the set before noon

    Donuts: donuts – a prefab tv shell with the same ol’ beginning and end where you plop whatever the current promo is in the middle and call it a day. Completely forgettable lazy crap.

    Do a Mahir: The Mahir phenomenon, aptly described in this article [salon], immediatly spawned a million “viral” Internet campaigns trying to ride a similar wave of “pass it on” hype. “Doing a Mahir” is to in essence, build a page equally naivly funny as Mahir’s, or in other closely related traits try to harness the same morbid curiosity of internet viewers. In other words, this is now the officially oldest viral advertising tactic, on par with traditional ad cliché propositions like “for all your [roast beef] needs.”
    This is not to be confused with another type of “viral” campaign , which could be anything from the “use hotmail now” link at the bottom of each one of your sent hotmails, to a site that offers elaborate Ecards that you send your friends in order for the site to get traffic, to sneaky places like Ecrush that send out “someone has a crush on you” and make you type in a large amounts of friends real emails before they reveal who it is, if it even is anybody but their own email-harvesting machine…

    Dupliclaims: it’s the word Tim cheif sloganmaven (r.i.p.) from adslogans.co.uk invented to describe Badland lookalike ads. The word stuck.

    Endline : see strapline.

    Fart Director: A staff designer who’s managed to parlay the last 12 years of a burnt-out career shuffling from design firm to design firm doing nothing but bitch about the coffee and the bathrooms and how the clients will NEVER PAY FOR A SHOOT AROUND HERE!

    Friday: It’s not casual in adland. Friday is pink slip day. [friday is also silly link day on adlist.]

    Hoaz: A hoax-person purposely designed in order to get net-wide and/or pressattention.
    The press [legit] attention can be it’s only goal, the more elaborate one use the pressattention to flog a product. See examples such as Netochka Nezvanova [salon article link]. Bot? Person? Artgang? Software engineer? Troll?.
    Expression coined to separate an elaborate Hoax-person/entity on the net from an elaborate Troll on the net with which a Hoaz shares many traits.

    Hoarse Whisperer: An executive who read the intro to one of those body language books and speed-read through the rest, who now makes an ass of himself in every meeting with overexaggerated winks, eyebrow wiggles, staredowns, hand and arm gestures, and intentional intrusion of personal zones to display how “alpha” he is.

    Junior Assistant Account Coordinator Planner Executive: Gopher

    Layout – never an idea: The layout itself can do most of the ideas job, where it is placed, how it looks communicates more than its given credit. But a layout is not an idea. Stating “I used blurry fonts first – they nicked my idea!“, is better said as: “I used blurry fonts first – they nicked my design style“.
    If blurred out fonts are used in order to communicate the need for new glasses and a visit to the optrician, the fonts are expressing the idea, but blurry fonts on their own aren’t an idea.
    Otherwise, a layout carries the idea but it is never the idea on it’s own.

    Viral ad (related to Mahir, umbrella-term.): When first coined – Steve Jurvetson and Tim Draper are credited with the term Viral Marketing in 1997 – the phrase “viral” was anything from those little sigfiles at the bottom of a hotmail mail to any other “wildfire” word of mouth.
    These days the term Viral is more often used in regards to actual commercials that spread like wildfire across the web, some agencies make “made for web only” commercials specifically. Anything too raunchy, sexy or anything that was “banned from TV” (has the potential of becoming a viral film. Viral sites are the best way of promoting them, a great example was the Fanta Shokata website which allowed punters to create their own films and spread them to friends – thus both allowing users to create a film and email their friends.
    Famous film examples: Lee & Rubberburner leaked films on the net via “Losers.org”and for us adgrunts Truth In Advertising tickled our funnbone extra much, both in 2000. Fred & Farid’s Xbox “champagne” 2002, Monster spoof “when I grow up” 2002, Ford Ka cat decapitation in 2004, the BIG ad and suicide vw bomber ad by Lee & Dan, 2005 – just to name a few.

    Master Bait: An older suit with a once notable past in a certain industry who is hired and paraded around to increase the chances of successfully wooing a client in that same industry. Unfortunately, the wooing fails, so the agency is stuck with a disinterested, expensive and grizzled grumpbucket until the contract runs out.

    Plannager : An account manager who really wanted to be a planner and who is constantly trying to prove that he or she would make a good one.

    Posse Galore: When an agency principal goes on a long distance trip to meet with a potential client who happens to be male, there’s usually at least two from this group, typically female, young and attractive, who find out that their experience is required to make the visitation go smoothly as well as ensure success. Oh, and they have to giggle on cue and only speak when spoken to.

    ROI???: Return Of Investment. Numbers for the number chrunching guys. DM – that is, Direct Marketing – are the media fellows that have the best track record in proving their ROI – they know exactly who they mailed and how many responded after all.

    Rounder: Primary responsibility is taking the edgy elements out of an ad that make the account executive and/or client and/or focus group uncomfortable.

    Sarchasm: – The gulf between the author of sarcasm and the recipient who doesn’t get it. Some people reckon we’re overly hash with our opinions here, but relax, it’s only advertising….

    Senior Guinea Pig: The poor soul whose first task in the morning is to test the brown office beverage and find out if the caffeinated swill is palatable.

    Slogan : see Endline.

    SpaSMS: expression coined here back on 2000 regarding the SMS advertising/marketing messages texted to mobile phones to more accurately describe them.

    Spamvertise: Expression coined eons ago, frequently used by places such as Spamcop to describe unsolicited bulk email advertising. There is no real marketing or skill or actual “targeting” to a specific group at play when peoplespamvertise just a million pissed off people who soon desert their email addresses in the vain hope that a new one, might stay spam free. In Dabitch’s humble opinion, any marketing on the net not expressively asked for should be banned and the fuckwads responsible flogged in public. Many share it since the receiver actually pays the bill for these “ads” in form of wasted resources, wasted time, and more often that you’d think, phonebill costs or “account is over the limit” bills. As far as I know, this is the only form of advertising where the receiver pays to receive something they didn’t ask for. [So did the now illegal Fax ads, that wasted away millions of rolls of fax paper and tied up office faxes all night long, but the cost of paper is usually smaller.]

    SPIM: Spam sent over instant messaging systems IM. Could be a bot that just spews a short “conversation” before telling you about a URL that you must visit – could be a cruder bot that just says “Hi” and then SPIMs you immediately. Worse, it could be a bot trying to trick you into downloading adware or a virus. In any case, it’s annoying.

    Strapline: positioning statement.

    SudS: Many ads around the world are simply dubbed to fit into a new market without much consideration for how different different markets actually are. Getting an “adaptation brief” usually means that you’ll be translating and dubbing a soap advert or washing powder commercial . Now you know what they mean when they say “I’m working on SudS all week.” It means they’re bored.

    Tagline : see slogan.

    Tart Director (courtesy caffeinegoddess): AD whose sole goal is to work with the hottest chicks possible and try to nail them too.

    Wardrobe Wench: Primary duty of this stereotypically female staffer is, whenever a PLC (potentially lucrative client) is to be in the agency within the next day or two, to make sure (via email, voicemail, post-its, group meetings and one-on-ones) that every creative in the shop knows that they are supposed to wear clothes and underbritches that are clean, relatively inoffensive and in tolerably good condition (by executive standards) on that particular day. In case of failure, she has a stock of button-down shirts and pullovers embroidered with the agency name and/or logo to throw on the worst offenders at the last possible minute.

    White space : White space does not communicate. But it sure is purdy.

    Usage rights : Legal permission to reproduce copy, photos, logos or other intellectual property. Nobody understands this these days so everyone yells “fair use” at the top of their lungs instead.

    Smells like lunch!

    Check out this KFC Press Release about a really innovative marketing campaign!

    In a marketing first, KFC is highlighting the launch of its $2.99 Deals by placing the mouth-watering aroma of Kentucky Fried Chicken in the halls and offices of corporate America.

    Forget television integrations or corporate naming rights, Kentucky Fried Chicken’s first-ever “scent-focused” pilot program teamed KFC with corporate mail rooms nationwide. Along with carrying inter-office mail, overnight packages and bills, mail carts in Washington, D.C., Chicago and Dallas delivered the aroma of freshly prepared Kentucky Fried Chicken during pre-lunch mail drops.

    Through the pilot program, KFC worked with an online company, a business-to-business consulting firm and a non-profit, to include a $2.99 Deal – a plated meal including KFC’s world famous chicken, a side item and a biscuit – on the actual mail carts that pass the offices of hungry workers.

    “There is truly no better brand ambassador worldwide than the signature aroma of freshly prepared Kentucky Fried Chicken,” said James O’Reilly, chief marketing officer for KFC. “And we couldn’t think of a better way to showcase the value of our new $2.99 Deal than to inject the mouth-watering scent of Kentucky Fried Chicken into the corridors of corporate America.”

    To bring the sweet-smelling promotion to life, KFC collaborated with Chemistry.com in Dallas; the Trade Association & Society Consultants of Washington, D.C.; and the Chicago offices of the Salvation Army.

     

    More Smelladvertising:

     

    image

    VIA (the washing powder) ran a poster campaign in Stockholm and Malmö which..er..actually smells!

    Push the little spout at the bottom of the poster and you’ll sniff a sample on how the washing powder smells. Or how clean clothes smell after being washed with Via.

    HOT!

    So, smell some fried chicken, and if it gets too much, there is always the refreshing detergent smell to wash it off! Anyone for coffee beans?

    More examples? Look at how newspapers are using smelladvertising to regain lost commercial revenues…here

    The IE8 concerns around the Chrome fever…

    In the midst of the Chrome Launch, Adage has this interesting viewpoint on Internet advertising and the implications that new browsers bring on to the table…

    Latest Microsoft Browser Fuels Fear

    IE8 Gives Web Surfers More Power to Block Ads and Cookies

    By Beth Snyder Bulik
    Published: August 28, 2008

    YORK, Pa. (AdAge.com) — Microsoft’s newest bro

    wser is still only in beta, but it already has the advertising world in a tizzy. Its “InPrivate” set of features on Internet Explorer 8 out this week has publishers, marketers and industry advocates worried that it could block their ability to distribute, track and even monetize what the Interactive Advertising Bureau values as a $21.2 billion-plus internet-ad industry.
    But Microsoft Internet Explorer general manager Dean Hachamovitch advises to remain calm. “The point isn’t to block content or ads. The point is to put users in control of what they’re sharing,” he said, adding he has read and heard many misconceptions about what InPrivate can and cannot do.
    Stealth surfing
    For instance, the InPrivate Browsing feature — already slang-termed “porn mode” — only allows a user to hide single browsing session activities from “over the shoulder” viewers such as family members. It does not block ads from being served to the user or from advertisers counting views or clicks.
    It works, and got its nickname, by letting users surf porn sites (or any other content, for that matter) without caching any content such as a list of URLs visited, cookies or other data. That could mean no cookies on your computer — as well as no cookies for future use by marketers or publishers, although only during selected InPrivate sessions.
    However, it is the InPrivate Blocking feature that seems potentially more worrisome for advertisers. InPrivate Blocking acts to inform users about sites that consistently track and collect browsing histories. In fact, when a user opts into an InPrivate session, it will automatically block third-party content if it detects that the third party has “seen” the user more than 10 times. So, for instance, if the third party is advertising.com and it is serving ads across 10 sites a user has visited during an InPrivate session, it will begin to block advertising.com tracking codes and possibly content on the 11th website.
    Cause for concern
    Mike Zaneis, VP-public policy for the Internet Advertising Bureau, said while he is encouraged that InPrivate is never a default option on Internet Explorer — meaning that users have to manually opt in each time — he still has concerns.
    “With IE’s market share, will so many people activate that so that it could affect the revenue side of the industry?” he asked. “Any content from anywhere that appears as third parties, whether advertising or stock tickers or news feeds, all appear as third parties, and in theory their content could be blocked.
    “And if you’re blocking all third parties, you’re also going to block all analytic companies,” he said. “You’d be blocking the companies that do the auditing of ad delivery.” He’s particularly concerned about the potential disruption to the entire accounting system of internet advertising.
    Mr. Hachamovitch concedes that IE 8 has no way of knowing if the content is an ad, a stock tracker or a newspaper column. It can only tell if it is third-party content. So that does mean that any content, say, ads, analytics and more, can be blocked. However, he repeated that the user must select InPrivate every time. And users can create “allow” and “block” lists, so-called whitelists and blacklists, to always allow content from trusted sources. Consumers can also subscribe to lists of acceptable content created by others.
    Microsoft itself has tips for publishers and advertisers on how to get third-party content and ads seen. Publishers, for instance, can serve the ads directly from their site (making them first-party content) or they can make third-party content look like first-party content, he said.
    Letting consumers decide
    Ultimately, the point of InPrivate is not to block anything, but instead to give consumers control of the online information they chose to share, or not, Mr. Hachamovitch said. “In a world of well-informed consumers who expect choice, we all need to be thoughtful about how we conduct business,” he said. “To me, this really starts the conversation. IE8 Beta 2 starts us thinking about the expectations people should have about what they share and how.”
    Of course, Microsoft is hardly anti-advertising, and in fact, depends on ad-servicing revenue from its own sites like MSN. In May 2007 it purchased for $5.9 billion aQuantive’s three businesses — Atlas, DrivePM and Avenue A — as a means to build out a massive ad platform, and it had pursued Yahoo in a bid to gain more display-ad leverage. Microsoft, moreover, is a longstanding member of the IAB.
    “From the Microsoft perspective,” said a spokeswoman, “we’re right there with the rest of the crowd in that we think there is a lot of benefit in targeted ads. We just believe consumers have the right to know it’s happening and to opt in.”
    JupiterResearch analyst Emily Riley said the industry upheaval may be moot soon enough anyway, as ad targeting has come under serious scrutiny from the Federal Trade Commission. She said she believes the many different industry factions will come up with — by force or free will — guidelines and standards that are acceptable to consumers and regulators.
    “In the short term, though, I can understand how it could be scary for advertisers, because ad targeting is so valuable,” she said.

    The “Viral” Mystery

    Ever wondered how agencies & clients alike are completely nuts about the “viral” phenomenon? Agency cant produce enough and clients can’t ask enough – anyone with an iota of an online marketing budget never fails to mention “can we have a viral along with the banner campaign”?!

    What’s the deal here? How can you possibly “create” a viral? Aren’t virals supposed to be “ideas”, rather than brand communication? I thought a good communication “became” a viral basis its spread-quotient – and if its an eDM or a video, its just easier to spread around…

    Anyway, so there is Webchutney, the supposed “viral pioneers” as they love to call themselves…with this new Center Fresh viral

    While the overall concept is nice..crass, but funny nevertheless, the funniest part that definitely is viral-able is this:
    Viral URL!

    Notice the URL?! I mean just obvious do they want it to be? Or are dumb customers expected to appreciate the fact that there “exists a viral”…a sure sign of “creative brilliance” & “amazing campaign roll-out”!

    Ahem..don’t miss the “Kitne Aadmi the..” question in the Q&A session..going by their liberal use of the concept, it seems Webchutney must be paying a retainer to Mr. Sippy!

    Webchutney and Center Fresh aren’t the only ones…there are a million campaign landing pages that have URL stating the obvious…”www.xyz.com/campaign/microsite”-like URL’s are pretty common..

    I do hope that better sense will prevail sooner than later as far as such freaky phenomenons are concerned!

    Photonic Integrated Circuit.

                         Photonic Integrated Circuit.

     

     

    Overview

    Scientists have developed what they claim is a small scratch on a piece of glass, which could make the internet nearly 100 times faster and give users unlimited, error-free access anywhere in the world. Lead researcher at the University of Sydney Ben Eggleton while making the announcement said, initial testing of the technology showed it was possible to achieve Internet speeds 60 times faster than the current Telstra network. But if developed further, the circuit could reach speeds 100 times faster, he added.

     

    What is ‘The Scratch’ all about?

    “The scratched glass we have developed is actually a Photonic Integrated Circuit. This circuit uses the ‘scratch’ as a guide or a switching path for information – kind of like when trains are switched from one track to another – except this switch takes only one picosecond to change tracks…this means that in one second the switch is turning on and off about one million times. We are talking about photonic technology that has terabit per second capacity, we [now] use electronics for switching and that has been okay, but as we move toward a more tech-savvy future there is a demand for instant Web gratification,” Eggleton said.The University of Sydney has developed the scratch in collaboration with the Technical University of Denmark and financial support from Australian Research Council.

     

    How it works

    The new device, called ‘scratch’, uses tiny scratches on a piece of glass to guide information along optical fibers rather than using electronics’ to do the same job.

    Information travels through the internet coded through a series of light flashes which are generated by lasers.

    These flashes are then converted into electrical signals which the computer uses to form what is seen on the screen. But there is only so much information the electrical components of a computer can deal with at any one time.

    To get around this obstacle the researchers created a filtering device which uses tiny narrow lines to filter the light into 64 channels, delivering much more information in a way which doesn’t overload the electronics of the computer.

    Scratch circuits would be installed where information is served from, such as on the computer of an internet service provider.

     

    General view

     

    According to the Centre for Ultra-high bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) at the University’s School of Physics, the scratch will mean almost instantaneous, error-free and unlimited access to the Internet anywhere in the world. Eggleton said that up until now information has been moving at a slow rate, but optical fibers have a huge capacity to deliver more. The scientists have claimed that this ‘small scratch on a piece of glass’ is a critical building block and a fundamental advance on what is already out there.

    David Britton, professor of physics at Glasgow University and a leading figure in the grid project, believes grid technologies “could revolutionize society…with this kind of computing power, future generations can collaborate and communicate in ways older people like me cannot even imagine,”

    Conclusion.

    The general opinion about the Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) is of a positive revolutionary turn in the world of internet. Networks that are potentially a hundred times faster than the already existing services without costing the consumer will positively change the face of the internet across the world.

    . This ‘Scratch’ gives the world an opportunity to get a lot done in less then a second and can take business on the internet to sky rocketing levels, especially online marketing.

     

    Resources

    http://www.rediff.com/money/2008/jul/10net.htm

    timesofindia.indiatimes.com/HealthSci/A_scratch_to_make_net_100_times_faster/articleshow/

    www.techworld.com.au/article/252361/photonic_switching_beckons_100x_internet_speeds

    www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,23995523-948,00.html

    www.usyd.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=2411

    kooladda.wordpress.com/2008/07/12/a-scratch-to-make-net-100-times-faster

     

     

     

    Less Is More

    So what is it that evades a mail recipient’s attention?
    According to Gary Levitt and Rob Lubow,who run marketing profs,a marketing blog, “In an attempt to break from the herd, many email marketers ironically adopt a herd mentality of more clutter, more content, more MORE.” Well, that’s exactly the wrong thing to do, apparently.

    In email, less is more, Levitt and Lubow say. To help you understand the need to simplify your e-outreach, they offer three key questions to ask yourself before your next email campaign:

    What kind of email do you want to receive? A personal note from a good friend is likely at the top of your list. And even then, you don’t expect more than a couple of lines of text.
    How much time will someone invest in an impersonal marketing message that’s also sent to thousands of other people? The answer: Not much. Instead, “[B]e a friend,” advise Levitt and Lubow. “Keep it simple. Keep it nice. Make a good subject line that’ll earn those 3.5 seconds you need to get your simple message across.”
    Will your message be sharing space with ads? Gmail, AOL and Hotmail are just a few of the providers that frame email with ads these days. “There’s only one way to stand out from all those ads,” the authors claim. “[L]ook less like an ad.”
    “Once simplicity is embraced, you’re free to converse plainly with your clients—easily and often. Designers, template-selection, and deadly cross-service compliance issues fall away. Your readers save time, too, and love you for it.”

    iPhone 2.0 launch – the marketing hype

    given Apple’s habit of creating a bang, the latest gossip doing the rounds is the launch of iPhone 2.0. Forget about company sponsored leaks, the way apple news spreads, and conclusions derived, is all pure marketing genius. And it’s all go to do with the product’s hype value – and the obsession apple fans have for the brand.  Read more to understand the madness:

    Reasons why Apple iPhone will be launched on 15th June:

    1. Apple 24-hr store closed on May 29th on account of a commercial shoot. The only two times the store was shut previously was when the iPhone and OS X Leopard were launched.

    2. AT&T sent all retail sales employees a no-vacation blackout memo between June 15 and July 15. Being the only carrier for iPhone 2.0, the assumption is valid that its all thanks to the launch. The same thing happened when iPhone was originally launched.

    3. This is the weirdest. Fortune published a report on a major spike in Ocean Containers labeled "electric computers" by Apple. This is direclty being refered to the 3G-enabled iPhone 2.0 that has apparently been shipped from Apple’s two major Asian suppliers!

    Compared to all other brands who love to leak stories, in Apple’s case, the non-leak formula seems to be the most effective!

    Stay glued to your PC on the 15th! Love it or hate it, you want to know what’s next as far as Apple is concerned!

    Guerilla marketing

    Guerilla marketing is an unconventional marketing intended to get maximum results from minimal resources.

    Coined by Jay Conrad Levinson, Guerilla marketing is more about matching wits than matching budgets. Guerilla marketing can be as different from traditional marketing as guerilla warfare is from traditional warfare. Rather than marching their marketing dollars forth like infantry divisions, guerilla marketers snipe away with their marketing resources for maximum impact.The term has since entered the popular vocabulary to also describe aggressive, unconventional marketing methods generically.

    Levinson identifies the following principles as the foundation of guerrilla marketing:

    • Guerrilla Marketing is specifically geared for the small business and entrepreneur.
    • It should be based on human psychology instead of experience, judgment, and guesswork.
    • Instead of money, the primary investments of marketing should be time, energy, and imagination.
    • the primary statistic to measure your business is the amount of profits, not sales.
    • The marketer should also concentrate on how many new relationships are made each month.
    • Create a standard of excellence with an acute focus instead of trying to diversify by offering too many diverse products and services.
    • Instead of concentrating on getting new customers, aim for more referrals, more transactions with existing customers, and larger transactions.
    • Forget about the competition and concentrate more on cooperating with other businesses.
    • Guerrilla Marketers should always use a combination of marketing methods for a campaign.
    • Use current technology as a tool to empower your business.
    A good example of guerrilla marketing was when a leading men’s magazine projected an image of Gail Porter onto the Houses of Parliament. It was a stunt that was talked about by everyone (well, nearly…certainly most men: but that was the intention anyway).

    It was an attempt to get people to vote in the ‘Worlds Sexiest Women’ poll. The results were outstanding – all down to the stunt creating huge public awareness. For a small business, this would probably be a little too extreme, but you get the picture.

    [slideshare id=297004&doc=304052-guerilla-marketing-1204913133402532-2&w=425]

     

    About MD

    Masala Digital is not just about Digital Marketing - it's about marketing in the digital age. The defining lines of marketing that segregated ATL, BTL & Digital hardly hold any water in the age of integrated marketing that assimilates effective practices across all available mediums to create truly integrated ideas. Masala Digital is the platform for sharing, collaborating and participating to add wings to these thoughts. You too can contribute..check out the "Contact Us" page for more information.